[Master Article] How To: Use the WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) Editor

Jessica -

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While working on your Art Storefronts website you may come across numerous editors that looks almost like something you would see in Microsoft Office. We call these boxes WYSIWYG Editors and they are available on any page you create on your Art Storefronts website.

 

These boxes are used to add additional content to your Art Storefronts website and offers you the ability to alter the text contained therein so that it best matches the vision you have for your site. Because these boxes contain so many options it may, at first, appear to be somewhat overwhelming. To combat this, we have created numerous articles regarding how to use this editor.

 

This editor, and the following articles are available for every user on our platform. If you are an Artist, Gallery, or Print Studio you will have access to all of these editors and each article below will be of use to you.


 

First, it's going to be a good idea to familiarize yourself with the functions of the WYSIWYG Editor. There are numerous buttons available for use here and we strongly recommend getting to know what their uses are.

Once you understand what the buttons in our editor do, you may want to move on to learning about basic tasks you can accomplish in the editor. First, we strongly urge you to learn about pasting information into this editor. If you paste something in the editor and it looks incorrect, you likely did so before reading our article. Please review the article regarding pasting text into the editor for a full understanding of how this function works.

After learning about pasting to the WYSIWYG Editor, you may want to learn how to upload images into the editor. This can be a useful feature for customizing your page and setting it apart from others around the internet.

One of the major functions provided in the WYSIWYG Editor is the ability to create links using text and images. You can also create anchors to allow customers to jump to specific portions of a page and later on if you decide any of these are no longer pertinent they can be removed.

Finally, the last, and arguably most complicated feature offered, is the ability to edit the Source Code of the WYSIWYG Editor. This is only recommended for use by those who have experience coding or have hired a web designer or developer to work on their website. If you are unfamiliar with coding, we strongly advise against altering the Source Code.

 

 

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